The approaching Finnish Championship, 10-12 December

This weekend, starting on Friday, is the Finnish Championship tournament. There are six players who all play each other, and the two best play a best-of-three final at a later date. While I’m also playing in the Championship tournament, next week is an exam week at my university, so I’ll be fairly busy for the next nine days – likely I’ll have no time to write a blog post during this time, unless I get especially motivated.

On Friday I’m against Mikko Siukola 4 dan, who I also played at the Rabbity six tournament two weeks ago. On Saturday I’m up against Namii 5 dan and ErgoProxy 5 dan from KGS, and on Sunday my opponents are Finland’s old foxes Lauri 4 dan and Vesa 5 dan. No game in this tournament will be easy, but as usual, I won’t be playing simply to win, but to learn more instead!

All games are likely shown on KGS, but I have information yet on which accounts shall be used. They’ll be at the top of the active game list, anyway, so getting online on time is enough. Friday’s game is 19:00 GMT +2, while Saturday’s and Sunday’s games are 10:30 and 15:00 GMT +2. Please come watch and cheer on me! :)

Questions and answers, part three; the 6-4 point

Hello world! Now I finally found the time to answer to Michi’s query regarding the 6-4 point. Like with normally with the questions and answers series, please write new questions as comments to this blog post!

First off, I compiled an sgf file¬†(updated on 10 November 2011!) with some more normal variations along with my comments. The eidogo plugin in this blog doesn’t show comments for now, so please download the file (the download link is just below the plugin) for the comments.

[sgfPrepared id=”0″]

The following, here, is for whole-board fuseki. Please check the joseki file first!

If black played double 6-4 points, for example like this, I feel that white 8 is a really feasible counter. After white 8, black can practically no longer have a big right side, ¬†which makes black 3 kind of useless. Later, if white gets the chance, he’ll take A. Black can surely make a game out of this, but it shouldn’t be so out of ordinary for white anymore.

If white plays double 6-4 points, black is simple to play as well. There are a few moves I would consider: black A is one, making white 2 rather useless again (black B later, then, given the chance). Black C instead would split the left side, not giving white 4 much to work for. Or, black could also just play his own game with D – there’s really no hurry in making the white stones useless.

As a summary, I do consider the 6-4 point playable, but it is making a player’s intentions painfully obvious (white 2 in the last figure clearly aims for the upper side, and white 4 for the left side). Personally I favor the 4-4, 3-3 and 3-4 points, which give a lot more flexibility to the follow-ups.

Continue reading “Questions and answers, part three; the 6-4 point”