Pandanet European Team Championship 2012, round 5: Finland vs. Israel

I figured the readers might be more interested in my game in the Pandanet European Team Championship from last Tuesday than anything from last weekend, so I’m prioritizing the non-insei game first. The tournament game actually took quite a bit of preparing from me. We had arranged for the game to start a bit earlier than the other games, at 17 PM CET, which means 1 AM here in Japan. The reason for putting the game forward was because Israel’s first board is also currently studying abroad — in South Korea, which is in the same time zone as Japan. I had to make sure that I’d still be in a good state of mind during the game, late into the night, so I altered my sleeping rhythm a bit for the game, and drank coffee late into Tuesday evening. I was successful in this, as I felt like I was in good shape during the game, but as I only got to sleep at about 4 AM, I was naturally incredibly tired the following day.

Currently, the fifth round’s situation is unfortunately 2-1 in Israel’s favor — the fourth game was arranged to be played next Tuesday due to some issues with the internet (or possibly IGS?). While Finland isn’t doing too well at the moment, I’m at least happy to say that I won my game against Israel’s first board, Ali Jabarin 6 dan. Here’s the game file along with some remarks! Some are my thoughts, and some are from Su Yang 6 dan. I’m thinking of also presenting this game to the professionals on next week’s Tuesday’s English class; if I get really good input from them, I’ll write another commentary relating to this game.

[sgfPrepared id=”0″]

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Excerpt from the Weekly go newspaper, part 3: ten classic joseki

Seems I got it wrong last week: we didn’t get ten most popular endgame moves this week in Weekly go, but instead ten most popular joseki! These are incredibly classic ones; all single digit kyu and dan level players are recommended to learn these if not already familiar with them. As usual, diagrams have been made with jGoBoard.

I’m pretty confident we’ll get ten most popular fuseki next week! What do you think will be the most popular one?

For those not familiar with the go terminology that appears in the following image captions:

  • Keima (“knight’s move”) means a shape similar to how the knight moves in chess (two spaces apart in height, one in width)
  • Ōgeima (“large knight’s move”) means a shape similar to keima, but three spaces apart in height instead of two.
  • Kosumi means a diagonal shape (one space apart in both height and width)
  • Slide is a play that literally slides under the opponent’s position, while (at least loosely) connected to one’s own stone that is exactly one line above. This means that a slide is usually also a keima, ōgeima or a daidaigeima (“very large knight’s move”).
#1: 80 votes: 3-4 point > one-space high approach > inner attachment

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