Teaching game and review with Kamimura Haruo, 9 dan

This is a game I played last weekend while at insei training. Whenever insei don’t come to play their games (they have to inform the instructors beforehand about not coming), they get forfeit losses. Their opponents, who then don’t get to play a league game, end up playing an instructor instead — that’s also what happened to me last weekend. It has now been three times that I missed out on playing 王, who used to be in B class two months ago, but dropped to C and started missing out on some of the game days. In a sense, not getting to play a league game is bad, but I think a free win and a teaching game with a 9 dan professional somewhat makes up for it!

Some of the commentary included in the sgf is my own, but a big portion is what Kamimura-sensei said while reviewing the game. The game has some unconventional opening game choices, which should be of interest to lower dan level readers.

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Go of Ten 1st birthday, third week results and first kenkyuukai

Today marks the 1-year anniversary of Gooften! Exactly one year ago, the first text was posted, and although I didn’t end up changing the look of the page as I said back then, I can still say that we’ve come a long way. In the beginning, Go of Ten had something like 50-150 visitors per day, depending on when the last post was written. Now, on a blog post day the number is something like 500-1000, and on a non-post day it’s still 250-500. The average number of visitors for this November is 474 so far. This is my 51st blog post so far, giving pretty much a pace of one blog post per week. Let’s hope that the numbers keep on going up in the future!

Last weekend’s insei games ended up with six wins out of seven games. On Sunday, on the first round, I ended up losing against insei number nine; I made my first big blunder in an insei game so far, and ended up losing some 50 points just for that. That was in the middle game, and by the endgame I counted I was about 10 points behind and resigned. The two other games on Sunday were pretty much easy wins. Summing up, so far my record in D class is 18 wins and 2 losses, for a winning percent of 90%. Unfortunately I didn’t find a good opportunity to take a picture of the results sheet, so we’ll have to do without for now.

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Class D, third week; insei-level opening theory

I’m writing this post partly as a test to see how big of a burden it is to write an update in the middle of an insei weekend, and partly because I feel inspired after what I learned today, and want to share the source of the inspiration to the world. Most of the game discussion in this blog post is rather higher-level, but most readers starting from strong kyu level players should find it useful. For those raring to know about my performance today, I scored four wins in four games, winning all by resignation.

 

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Questions and answers, part three; the 6-4 point

Hello world! Now I finally found the time to answer to Michi’s query regarding the 6-4 point. Like with normally with the questions and answers series, please write new questions as comments to this blog post!

First off, I compiled an sgf file (updated on 10 November 2011!) with some more normal variations along with my comments. The eidogo plugin in this blog doesn’t show comments for now, so please download the file (the download link is just below the plugin) for the comments.

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The following, here, is for whole-board fuseki. Please check the joseki file first!

If black played double 6-4 points, for example like this, I feel that white 8 is a really feasible counter. After white 8, black can practically no longer have a big right side,  which makes black 3 kind of useless. Later, if white gets the chance, he’ll take A. Black can surely make a game out of this, but it shouldn’t be so out of ordinary for white anymore.

If white plays double 6-4 points, black is simple to play as well. There are a few moves I would consider: black A is one, making white 2 rather useless again (black B later, then, given the chance). Black C instead would split the left side, not giving white 4 much to work for. Or, black could also just play his own game with D – there’s really no hurry in making the white stones useless.

As a summary, I do consider the 6-4 point playable, but it is making a player’s intentions painfully obvious (white 2 in the last figure clearly aims for the upper side, and white 4 for the left side). Personally I favor the 4-4, 3-3 and 3-4 points, which give a lot more flexibility to the follow-ups.

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