Pandanet European Team Championship 2012, round 5: Finland vs. Israel

I figured the readers might be more interested in my game in the Pandanet European Team Championship from last Tuesday than anything from last weekend, so I’m prioritizing the non-insei game first. The tournament game actually took quite a bit of preparing from me. We had arranged for the game to start a bit earlier than the other games, at 17 PM CET, which means 1 AM here in Japan. The reason for putting the game forward was because Israel’s first board is also currently studying abroad — in South Korea, which is in the same time zone as Japan. I had to make sure that I’d still be in a good state of mind during the game, late into the night, so I altered my sleeping rhythm a bit for the game, and drank coffee late into Tuesday evening. I was successful in this, as I felt like I was in good shape during the game, but as I only got to sleep at about 4 AM, I was naturally incredibly tired the following day.

Currently, the fifth round’s situation is unfortunately 2-1 in Israel’s favor — the fourth game was arranged to be played next Tuesday due to some issues with the internet (or possibly IGS?). While Finland isn’t doing too well at the moment, I’m at least happy to say that I won my game against Israel’s first board, Ali Jabarin 6 dan. Here’s the game file along with some remarks! Some are my thoughts, and some are from Su Yang 6 dan. I’m thinking of also presenting this game to the professionals on next week’s Tuesday’s English class; if I get really good input from them, I’ll write another commentary relating to this game.

[sgfPrepared id=”0″]

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European Team Championship, final round showdown

Last Tuesday, on May 24, was the ninth and final round of the Pandanet Go European Team Championship.  The final round was important in deciding which countries get to play in the European Team Championship tournament in the European Go Congress 2011 in Bordeaux, but it was also crucial in determining which team drops from the A league to the B league next year. The system is such that the last team of the league drops automatically and gets replaced with the winning team of the lower league, and the second to last team of the league plays a qualifying match with the second best team of the lower league. The ninth-round game between Finland and Serbia was to determine which team drops automatically, and which team gets to qualify.

The situation before the round was exceedingly exciting: Finland and Serbia were tied in both game points and board points. If a tie like this were to occur after the ninth round, too, the next tie-breaker would be the number of first-board wins; before the ninth round, Finland and Serbia were tied on this part, as well. In a sense, the first-board game of the match was worth two games. Having known about this situation well in advance, I had been training a lot during three weeks between rounds 8 and 9, my main methods of training having been doing tsumego and reviewing professional games.

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Suddenly, Takapotku!

As some of you may have noticed from the upcoming tournaments notice on the right-hand side bar of this page, the biggest Finnish go tournament takes place this weekend in Helsinki. I have been fairly busy with school work for the past few weeks, and it’s a shame that I haven’t found the time to write the “preparing for Takapotku” blog post series – I’m sure many people would be interested in how I prepare for a tournament when there’s seriously limited time. Actually, that’s why I’m writing this post here and now!

The Takapotku tournament is part of the Pandanet Go European Cup, and consequently there will be game relays on the Internet Go Server (IGS).

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Christmas update

Merry Christmas! It’s been incredibly difficult to muster some energy to write here, when I’ve finally been able to simply relax and have a good time with my family and friends. There’s a good number of questions I’ve yet to answer, as well as the game review I promised – however, with the trip to London being such a short time off, I’ll probably reserve this day as well for relaxation.

The plan for close future is as follows: on December 27 (that is, tomorrow) I travel to London, the tournament being held on the four following days after that. If I can get access to internet, I’ll try my best to post some tournament games here with my own comments. Then there’s two days of free time on London, and I arrive back on January 3. I’ll get back to working on the questions and the promised game review then.

I’ve no clear picture of the London Open Go Congress’s organization, but I would guess they are relaying some games on IGS. If that’s the case, please do come and cheer on me, again!

Preparing for Rabbity six, part three: learning from past mistakes

Long time no write! The past week has been a bit busy for me, hence the small amount of posts here. Right now I’m in Tampere, ready to play in the Rabbity six tournament which begins tomorrow. I decided to share with you readers what I reviewed with Jeff concerning the game I played with smartrobot on KGS last week. I had black in the game.

Generally, I thought the game was very good, the number of noticeable mistakes being rather small for both. Apart from this game, I’ve played several other games as a preparing for the tournament – also in the European Team Championship tournament on IGS. My general feeling is that I’m pretty much in top shape now!

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