Go of Ten 1st birthday, third week results and first kenkyuukai

Today marks the 1-year anniversary of Gooften! Exactly one year ago, the first text was posted, and although I didn’t end up changing the look of the page as I said back then, I can still say that we’ve come a long way. In the beginning, Go of Ten had something like 50-150 visitors per day, depending on when the last post was written. Now, on a blog post day the number is something like 500-1000, and on a non-post day it’s still 250-500. The average number of visitors for this November is 474 so far. This is my 51st blog post so far, giving pretty much a pace of one blog post per week. Let’s hope that the numbers keep on going up in the future!

Last weekend’s insei games ended up with six wins out of seven games. On Sunday, on the first round, I ended up losing against insei number nine; I made my first big blunder in an insei game so far, and ended up losing some 50 points just for that. That was in the middle game, and by the endgame I counted I was about 10 points behind and resigned. The two other games on Sunday were pretty much easy wins. Summing up, so far my record in D class is 18 wins and 2 losses, for a winning percent of 90%. Unfortunately I didn’t find a good opportunity to take a picture of the results sheet, so we’ll have to do without for now.

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Class D, third week; insei-level opening theory

I’m writing this post partly as a test to see how big of a burden it is to write an update in the middle of an insei weekend, and partly because I feel inspired after what I learned today, and want to share the source of the inspiration to the world. Most of the game discussion in this blog post is rather higher-level, but most readers starting from strong kyu level players should find it useful. For those raring to know about my performance today, I scored four wins in four games, winning all by resignation.

 

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Second weekend in class D

Right after my trip to Innoshima, it was time for another insei weekend. Right now I’m at some kind of a stress peak, having had a great deal of things to do, but starting tomorrow I’ll have a reasonable amount of free time again.

I played six games last weekend, against the insei numbered 12 and 13, and then against the ones numbered 1-4 (them being the ones who dropped to class D from class C this month). The former C-classers were indeed quite strong, and I lost my game against the one ranked first. I’m including the kifu of that game in this blog post.

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First week in class D

Another insei week is now done with, this one having been my first week in the D class. My result was another 7/7 (seven wins out of seven games), meaning that if there was a playing level difference to the E class, it’s still not quite decisive. I only played the insei ranked from place 5 to 12 (myself being ranked 11), so I didn’t get to play the insei who were in class C last month. I’m hoping they’ll be of different caliber than the rest — at least in class E, there was a notable difference between the previously-D-class insei and previously-not. The difference is mostly in technique relating to the opening game and to shape, so when playing a peaceful game, even class D insei can give me some hard time.

Indeed, having moved up a class, the first thing this weekend I wanted to probe out the level of my new opponents. The very first game I played peacefully, which actually led me to being a little bit behind in terms of points sometime in the middle game. Some manoeuvres later I did get the lead, however, and finally won the game by 6.5 points. Thanks to these games having byo-yomi, the opponents no longer make such blatant mistakes (well, myself included of course) as in the E class. My reaction to the first game was something along the lines of “Phew, that was close, better make sure I don’t get more games as close as this one”, and the six following games were more fighting-oriented. The same six I also won by resignation.

Some people have expressed interest in speculating the level of my future adversaries, so I went out of my way on Sunday’s lunch break to take photos of the C and D class results sheets:

I can append the results a bit from my memory: I, and the insei numbered 1-4, all got two more wins.

Just to get the number of Japan-related photos up, here’s also one from the Nihon Ki-in’s entrance hall:

The entrance hall of the Nihon Ki-in: doors are behind the photographer, and on the left side, out of the photo, we have shelves with copies of Hikaru no Go, free to read. The people here are following a go instruction television programme, which are shown through most of the day — unless there is an important professional game going on, in which case the game is relayed. In the very back, there are the elevators which I usually take to the insei classroom.

Of course, an insei related blog post is nothing without a game record, so here’s the second-most-peaceful game that I played this weekend. I was looking to fight in this one, but the opponent wouldn’t let me.

[sgfPrepared id=”0″]

I somehow got the impression that my opponent here (insei number 8 in the results sheet) is a fan of Lee Changho, due to his steady and simple way of playing.

At move 14, I had the sequence of black 1, white 2, black 3, white 4 and black 5 in mind, but for some reason I chose the inferior way of playing, seen in the game record. However…

…move 24 seems like an incredibly slow white move, even if there was some potential threat at d9 or e9 to try to cut the white stones apart. I would have played k3 as white without thinking.

At move 29, the game already feels good to black.

Move 38: this move, even if today sometimes seen in professional games, was the one that struck me as the most Lee Chango -like move in the game. It works effectively at getting a base for the white stone, prioritizing territory over influence since the centre area looks like dame anyway. I planned the answer of black 39 so that I’d have the chance to exploit white’s shape weakness of l18 later.

Moves 47-66: this sequence somehow worked incredibly smoothly for black; even though the corner died, black got a fair profit while reserving sente.

The game quickly proceeds to the endgame after the upper side sequence, starting with black l18, is carried out. Eventually, white resigns because of the point difference.

Since the D class has an even number of 14 insei, I’ll unfortunately no longer get teaching games with the instructors. However, it’s still possible to get a review if a game ends quickly enough, and if the teacher is free at the time, as long as I’m able to ask for the review in Japanese.

This week, on Thursday, I’m finally doing some vital Japanese go-related activity that I missed out on my last trip here, two years ago: I’m visiting the island of Innoshima, the birthplace of Honinbō Shuusaku (1829-1862), up to date one of the most famous (and strongest) go players ever. Innoshima is a good 700 kilometres away from Tokyo, so a two-day trip is necessary. Points of interest while in Innoshima will be Shusaku’s grave and the Shusaku museum, which includes go equipment used by the legend himself. Expect to read a report on this trip in approximately one week!

Level up!

Although there’s one week of October left, the October Nihon Ki-in insei league is now over, and we’ll already start with November’s league this weekend. Since this way, one “month” only has 28 days, we’re running a little bit fast — this is compensated by the insei getting a Christmas holiday of two weeks, right after the December league stops at December 18. My final score in class E was 40 wins to three losses, easily giving me the first place of the class. From next weekend on, then, I’ll be starting at class D with a significantly smaller amount of games to be played, but with slower time settings. The exact settings are described here (in the first paragraph), in case somebody missed them.

Yesterday we had the fourth installment of the English lesson for professionals. The lesson went otherwise as normal, me presenting my insei games and the professionals commenting them in English, but there were two surprise factors. First was that Tom, my friend from the Nihon Ki-in, had through some contacts gotten us two new western participants: Andreas from Italy and Gediminas from Lithuania. Of them, Andreas had played a little bit some fifteen years ago, and Gediminas was new to the game. The reviewing part of the English lesson, then, likely wasn’t very useful or interesting to the newcomers, but after two game reviews, we had the professionals teach Andreas and Gediminas some basic rules of the game — again in English, of course! I helped a bit, but the professionals did very well on their own part. The second surprise factor was that Takemiya-sensei also attended the lesson! He was present for the first 45 minutes, commenting one of the insei games that I lost, and then went on to his weekly dancing lesson. Could I say, then, that I have taught Takemiya? Maybe best not to.

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Results and more on insei customs

Now, after the third October insei week is done with, I’m already able to claim the first place of class E. My result last weekend was another 11 wins, 0 losses, giving me a total result so far of 31 wins and 2 losses. The number two in class E has so far 13 losses, so even in the worst-case scenario, were I not to attend next week, it would be a tie for the first place. Needless to say, I won’t even think about not attending next weekend — after all, this training is what I came to Japan for. There’s one more weekend of October left, after which the top four insei (based on results) of each class go up a class, and the bottom four go down one. Class E has 60 minutes of time reserved for one game, resulting in a fast 30 minutes sudden death (with no byo yomi) time setting, but class D already has 90 or 120 minutes of time per round, depending on whether it’s a three or four-game day. Class D’s time settings are 40 minutes of main time with a 40 seconds per move Japanese byo yomi on three-game days, and 30 minutes of main time with a 30 seconds per move Japanese byo-yomi on four-game days.

I thought the readers might find the insei results sheet system interesting, so I went and took a photo. The system is, in fact, same as the one we’ve seen in Hikaru no Go! So far, I haven’t stamped my own palm in order to “grab the win”.

Red circles indicate wins, while black circles indicate losses. 中 inside a red circle means that the game was won by resignation, 5半 means a win by 5.5 points, and 不 means a default win. テアキ means a free round, due to the odd number of insei in class E. This sheet is for weeks 3 and 4; the results of the first two weeks are written in the lower part of the sheet.

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Insei report after the first weekend

Insei training isn’t light, I’ll give you that! The schedule is strict and incredibly full, and being an insei isn’t just about playing go. The school is, after all, meant for children who are potentially going to become professional go players. In addition to gaining playing strength, then, the teachers will do their utmost to also get the children to act like professional go players should. This also goes for wannabe-pro foreigners who find their way to the school. In a sense, it’s kind of like I’m back in elementary school, just the manners that are being taught are from a different culture. It is a relief that the teachers, while being strict, are also nice, and recognize that I’m to break the form at times, coming from a different culture myself.

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Day of departure

Gifts? Check! Clothes? Check! Passport with visa? Check! Wallet, laptop, phone, rechargers, etc, etc, etc? Check! Weight limit exceeded? Check! Something forgotten? Most likely, but it shouldn’t be vital! Time before the airplane departs? Less than seven hours. Final blog post? Soon done!

The above should describe my current situation quite well. Today 17:15 PM Finnish time, my airplane departs for Tokyo, where I’ll arrive 2:55 AM Finnish time, meaning 8:55 AM Japanese time — it’s going to become one really long day. Once there, I’ll have quite a rigmarole to clear up: getting used to the new settings, meeting with Nihon Ki-in personnel and friends on Thursday, doing an interview on Friday, studying as insei right away in the weekend, and registering as alien at a local police office sometime during my first three weeks.

At this point, I would like to thank everybody who has helped to make my trip to Japan possible: Kobayashi Chizu sensei and Tomotaka Urasoe of Nihon Ki-in, my good friend Kurt for fixing my accommodation problem, Jaakko Virtanen with his company Virte-metalli and the Finnish-Japanese Organization for providing me with a big enough travel budget, and my family, girlfriend and go player friends for all the encouragement and practical help!

My Finnish readers may be interested to know that I also have a travel blog in Finnish at insei.japanissa.fi! Rest assured, English readers, I’ll make sure to update this blog often enough.

 

 

One week to go!

As the topic also states, I’m now only one week off from going to Japan! My period as insei starts right away on October 1, so I will only have some three days of time to get used to the new surroundings before I start with the real deal. As far as I know, I will be starting from the lowest insei group, so it may take a while before I start getting reasonably difficult games — yet I’m sure that if I don’t take my initial opponents seriously, as well, I may get some surprising losses! Most of the insei kids are most likely serious enough about what they’re doing.

My travel preparations are by now practically done, travel insurance included. For past several days I’ve been heavily concentrating on improving my Japanese language skills, to the extent of studying my university’s Japanese courses’ material without actually attending to the courses. I’ve also been reading a Japanese go theory book (Kihon Senryaku, “Basic strategy”: while claiming it is basic, most of its content I’ve never heard about before!) and Hikaru no Go in Japanese — while there are plenty of kanji that I need to check from the dictionary, I do understand most of the language after I get the hiragana versions of the words. It is probably not impossible for me, then, to survive in Japan with my current language skills. Some of the Japanese grammar still puts me off, however: for instance, it seems quite ridiculous that Japanese doesn’t have an equivalent for the English auxiliary verbs of “must” or “have to”. Instead, when in Japanese you indicate a compulsion to do something, you have to twist the whole sentence into a double negation! “You have to pay” would actually be something like “Speaking of you, not paying is not allowed”. These kinds of details are like to confuse me for a long time.

Congress game against Svetlana Shikshina, with impressions from Ten and comments by Takemiya 9p

I got a sudden inspiration to finally comment a game for this blog, and what could be a better choice than the exciting game I played with Svetlana in the European Go Congress this year, to which I also received commentary by Takemiya Masaki 9 dan? The game was initially difficult for me for non-obvious reasons, but I managed to turn it around when the game started nearing the endgame. I played with white. Sit back, relax and enjoy!

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