In China, part four: Playing at a local tournament

Peter, the main organizer of the Experience Go in China program, invited three of the participants, me and Namii and Sadaharu on KGS, to play in a local team tournament. The tournament was, as I understood, a match between the Beijing university (that’s who we played for) and a local go club in Beijing. There were only two rounds, and each team had 12 players: whichever team got more game wins in the two rounds won the tournament.

The tournament was held last Wednesday at a local middle school named RDFZ — Jeff’s opinion was that the random-looking letters actually represented some Chinese words. Me and Namii were content to pronounce the name as rdfz. Outside the school, they had one of those announcement screens that showed information about the tournament. We got some good laughs from the typo they made with Namii’s KGS nick, shown below:

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In China, part three: Quick review of the go salon game

I had my earlier-posted go salon game reviewed by Ben, 3 dan professional, yesterday, and will write up the comments here for the readers’ delight. Due to time constraints, I won’t create figures of the kifu this time, but will simply add the comments under the Eidogo plugin. Here we go!

[sgfPrepared id=”0″]

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In China, part two: Arrival, and playing at the Japanese go salon

Yes, Japanese go salon – not Chinese. There’s, as far as I know, exactly one Japanese-type go salon in Beijing, with a go equipment store included. I was also extremely thrilled to find a traditional Japanese room with all manner of things Fujisawa Shuko inside: his old paper fan, eyeglasses, hat, go books, go sets, etc. I spent a good while taking pictures, one of which is included right below.

After seeing the room, I went to the equipment store and got myself a replica of the fan Shuko used to have — its price was equal to ten restaurant trips in Beijing, but I wasn’t concerned about money at the time.

Of course, a trip to a go salon also involves playing. I got paired against the owner of the go salon, according to what I heard, a Chinese 6 dan. The game was of good quality, and turned out very exciting. I’m hard-pressed to find enough time to comment the game at the moment, but here’s the kifu nevertheless!

[sgfPrepared id=”1″]

Apart from the go salon trip, there really hasn’t been time for anything but to getting used to the new environment. The arrival was especially difficult: I didn’t sleep on the airplane at all, so I was already tired when we arrived in Beijing in the morning. I did manage to stay awake until about 5 PM, but then couldn’t help falling asleep — and waking up at 10 PM! We then went to a restaurant and passed some time, and finally got around to sleeping at 2 AM. After that, my sleeping rhythm has become somewhat more regular.

Time to go sleep now, catch you all later! I’ll try to get around to writing some thoughts about the game presented earlier.

European Team Championship, final round showdown

Last Tuesday, on May 24, was the ninth and final round of the Pandanet Go European Team Championship.  The final round was important in deciding which countries get to play in the European Team Championship tournament in the European Go Congress 2011 in Bordeaux, but it was also crucial in determining which team drops from the A league to the B league next year. The system is such that the last team of the league drops automatically and gets replaced with the winning team of the lower league, and the second to last team of the league plays a qualifying match with the second best team of the lower league. The ninth-round game between Finland and Serbia was to determine which team drops automatically, and which team gets to qualify.

The situation before the round was exceedingly exciting: Finland and Serbia were tied in both game points and board points. If a tie like this were to occur after the ninth round, too, the next tie-breaker would be the number of first-board wins; before the ninth round, Finland and Serbia were tied on this part, as well. In a sense, the first-board game of the match was worth two games. Having known about this situation well in advance, I had been training a lot during three weeks between rounds 8 and 9, my main methods of training having been doing tsumego and reviewing professional games.

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Nordic championship, finnished

It’s actually been well over a week since the Nordic championship was held, but that doesn’t stop me from writing about it now! As some of the readers likely know, I ended up winning the championship. Results of the tournament can be found for instance here. The Nordic champion, like the Finnish champion, gets to hold the challenge trophy for the following year. The trophy is pictured here!

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Irish go congress report

Long time no write! I’m now back from one month of quite intensive university studying, and also from a six-day trip to Dublin. Ireland was a completely new experience to me, and also a really nice one: I very much liked the feel to Dublin as well as the architecture, not to mention the natural sights. The tournament went reasonably well: I got a 4-1 result, beating Wang Wei after a lucky turn in the game, but lost to Ondrej Silt in quite a similar fashion. In the end, we had a completely even score with Wei, and so ended up sharing the first place!

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Secondary goals, natural styles and countering your opponent’s plans

I had for long thought that I could develop for myself an ideal style of play – one with which I could, without much thought, play moves ordinary to me – and then I would win every game. That was my long-term goal, anyway, even if it was unachievable. For a period of time I experimented upon a really high-flown style of playing, where I usually ended up with a huge framework in the centre of the board. I liked that way of playing so much that I started playing like that all the time.

Then I met an opponent who, instead of challenging my plans like the others had, let me have my way. He, too, had his own grand plans for the game field, and wasn’t concerned with what I was building. I got baffled, challenged his plans, and even though the game went fine for some time, I eventually lost it. The same thing repeated with the same opponent for several times. I really couldn’t take it when my opponent let me have what I wanted.

For me, this course of events felt like first I was on my way to develop a perfect sword fighting style, which no other swordsman could counter, and then I met a guy with a gun.

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Finnish Championship, finished

The late 2010 championship finals are now officially over! I successfully scooped the championship for myself with a 2-1 result – Javier-Aleksi put up a splendid battle. With the Finnish points system, however, I won’t be representing Finland in the world amateur championships for a few more years. Here’s the challenge trophy I will be holding until the next championships!

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3-3 strategy; Pandanet European Team Championships, round three

Today’s post’s theme revolves around strategy based on the 3-3 point, as per Joachim’s inquiry. The example game in question was played yesterday in the Pandanet European Team Championships: I defeated Catalin Taranu of Romania by resignation, getting revenge for my loss to him in the European Go Congress 2010. The game this time was very good, with few apparent mistakes for both sides. I received commentary for the game by An Younggil 8 dan professional right after the game; some bits of what I write here come from there. I play black.

More sharp-eyed readers might notice that I differentiate between writing about black in first person and in third person: when I write in first person, I am reflecting on my thoughts during the game, and when in third person I’m looking at the position now, after the game.
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Slow down, you move too fast

Unlike the topic could imply, this text isn’t about about the process of placing a stone on the board, nor about playing times, but instead about the pace of stones played on the board themselves.

The exact wording of the topic comes from a story I saw on the internet, in which Washington Post conducted a social experiment: Joshua Bell, one of the greatest musicians in the world, played some of the world’s most intricate violin music for one hour on a public place with a $3,500,000 violin, and no passer-by realized it. The punchline of the story was as follows: “If we do not have a moment to stop and listen to one of the best musicians in the world, playing some of the finest music ever written, with one of the most beautiful instruments ever made… How many other things are we missing?”

Seeing the 1994 movie recently, The Shawshank Redemption, made me think a lot about time (some minor spoilers about the movie included in this paragraph). The movie is about prison inmates, the main characters being sentenced for life – they’ve got the time to do what not, but there’s not too much you can do in a prison. For most of the time, the protagonist is taking his time leisurely, without a worry in the world, yet making the prison a better place for other inmates. The movie made it seem like the inmates actually had it pretty well: food, shelter and basic hygiene and other needs guaranteed, and certainly not many things to be concerned about. With less content in each of their days, they could spend more time concentrating on what they’re doing, instead of having to hurry and conduct different businesses all the time. That certainly leaves more space to appreciate the beauty of things. A released, old inmate sends his friends a letter that begins as follows: “Dear fellas, I can’t believe how fast things move on the outside. I saw an automobile once when I was a kid, but now they’re everywhere. The world went and got itself in a big damn hurry.” Was a pretty touching scene.

How do these stories relate to go? Other than the more obvious realization that one well-played and enjoyed game could well be worth more than multiple fast and hastily played games, I also found an allusion to sente (“preceding move“, in common usage meaning a move or sequence that tempts the opponent to respond in some fashion) and gote (“following move“, meaning a move or sequence that doesn’t tempt the opponent to respond in any fashion). The amateurish way of playing unnecessary sente and forcing moves, extremely often seen in internet games, I could very well dub “getting in a big damn hurry”. It is not uncommon at all that instead of trying to do everything at the same time (like real-life multitasking), doing one thing properly is much better. Sente is well-used if there is a task you absolutely have to accomplish in a way that you also get to some other part of the board first. The forcing moves you may have to make will make the opponent’s position significantly stronger, but sometimes it may be worth it. In the opening and middle games, I consider it safe to say that trying to settle multiple positions in sente is never ever a good idea.

Here’s my game against Wang Wei 6 dan in the London Open Go Congress – I think I was able to play a few good gote moves, even if I did get hasty during the middle game. I was black.

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