Hans Pietsch Memorial, rest of the game reviews

After a longish pause, here come the rest of the reviews of my Hans Pietsch Memorial tournament games! Seeing as how Csaba Mero, main organizer of the tournament, put up a great report of the tournament, including some photos and also game reviews from the last three rounds, I will direct you there instead of writing my own versions.

In addition to the review of the first game that I posted earlier, then, here come the reviews ofmy round 2 and 3 games, against Ondrej Silt and Cornel Burzo respectively. Some of the opening game commentary is courtesy of my teacher, Kobayashi Chizu 5 dan professional.

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PETC game revisited — and some other stuff

As I also tweeted earlier, I missed getting promoted to B class by a hair (that means, by the amount of one single win — I’ve got to work harder in February!). My score for January was 13-11 in the end, which is not too good a winning percentage yet. As added pressure, Kobayashi-sensei just recently returned from her trip to the US, and brought me a small gift to celebrate my promotion to B class — which I finally didn’t make. Now I possess the gift, but am not allowed to open it before I do get promoted. The usual Japanese reaction to this would be to exclaim “厳しい!” (= “kibishii” = severe/strict) The aforementioned gift looks like this, and will be situated right next to the go board I’m using for the time being:

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C class third week update

As some of you may already have read from my Twitter page, I got three wins and three losses last weekend. It’s easiest if I just show the photo of the results sheet now that I managed to take one:

The photo’s quality is again a little bit bad: I lost to insei 11 by half a point, and to insei 2 by 2.5 points. Yesterday, at the Mimura dojo, I played a dojo league game against Mimura junior and lost by 1.5 points — all of these losses seem to be caused by my donating away free points in the endgame! Some endgame training is definitely in order. I did also play a 10-second game against Mimura-sensei yesterday, and the game stayed quite interesting until early endgame, when I finally messed up and lost any hope of a close game. Also, as I wrote just a bit ago, I also got a nice tsumego collection to work out from Mimura-sensei.

Seeing from the results so far, it now seems impossible for me to rise to B class next month, as I’ve way too many losses. I’ll be working my hardest not to drop to D class instead!

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C class insei games

I’m still in a power-saving mode because I’ve been incredibly busy lately again, but I figured I’d quickly post two of the C class higher-end insei games I’ve played.

The first one here was against the second-ranked insei: this was probably the game that I lost the most badly last weekend. Comments are mostly courtesy of Kobayashi Chizu-sensei, who kindly analysed most of my last weekend’s gamest when we met last Wednesday. She gave me some tasty French cheese and bread as a present, too!

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Second English study session

Yesteday we had the second session of the concept of “professionals learn English and Ten learns go”. Practically the setting is that I am presenting some of my (insei or otherwise) games on a board in a classroom in the Nihon Ki-in, with about six or seven professionals present on average, and the professionals attempt to comment the games in English. This time, the strongest professional present was 7 dan. The concept is courtesy of Kobayashi Chizu sensei.

Yesterday, before delving deeper into the game of the day, we recapped some important basic terms related to go. Kobayashi-sensei wasn’t present, so if it wasn’t for Simon’s assistance, I would have been on my own for the English teaching part. Simon did indeed a great job in assisting me, helping me with a lot of translations, and writing the English terms up on a whiteboard for the professionals to take notes of. At the beginning of the study session, I was initially slightly lost at how to take charge of everything, so I quite randomly took the English words for parts of the go board as the first content of the day: 隅=すみ=sumi=corner, 辺=へん=hen=side (upper/top, lower/bottom, left, right), 中央=ちゅうおう=chuuou=centre.

The English terms seemed to be new for most of the “students”, so it turned out to be good opening practice. I was quite strict on the words’ pronunciation, due to the fact that in Japanese, people sometimes use the Japanglish words of コーナー (“koonaa”, corner) and センター (“sentaa”, center). Apart from the *er sound, there’s not a real difference. We then started with the game review, and also recapped terms like connection, cut, extension, jump, et cetera. I’m not sure this whole studying concept provides for even-handed learning for all parties; the professionals are only learning English, while aside from go technique, I’m also learning Japanese! And for some reason, I still seem to hold the teacher’s role.

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EGC report

It’s well past the European Go Congress already, and I myself am back from a short holiday. Even if it’s a bit late, I thought it’d be nice to write about the topmost impressions of my second trip to France, and my fifth go congress.

The congress was situated in a suburb of the legendary city associated with wine, Bordeaux. The suburb, Talence, itself seemed to be a large university campus. The organizers had arranged for several university buildings to function as the congress area — a common solution, if a bit cumbersome. Comparing to all the other congresses I’ve been to so far, the general distance between the congress buildings was the longest. The congress in Villach, 2007, was remarkably good in the sense that everything was under the same roof; it was incredibly easy to find all sorts of activity in case one got bored. In Bordeaux, although the setting was functional enough, many evenings felt somehow hollow. Luckily it was easy enough to get on the tram and travel to the downtown of Bordeaux, which was full of things to see and do. Indeed, Bordeaux provided for some really nice sightseeing:

The water mirror of Bordeaux, likely one of the city's best-known sights.

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