Finnish Championship, finished

The late 2010 championship finals are now officially over! I successfully scooped the championship for myself with a 2-1 result – Javier-Aleksi put up a splendid battle. With the Finnish points system, however, I won’t be representing Finland in the world amateur championships for a few more years. Here’s the challenge trophy I will be holding until the next championships!

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3-3 strategy; Pandanet European Team Championships, round three

Today’s post’s theme revolves around strategy based on the 3-3 point, as per Joachim’s inquiry. The example game in question was played yesterday in the Pandanet European Team Championships: I defeated Catalin Taranu of Romania by resignation, getting revenge for my loss to him in the European Go Congress 2010. The game this time was very good, with few apparent mistakes for both sides. I received commentary for the game by An Younggil 8 dan professional right after the game; some bits of what I write here come from there. I play black.

More sharp-eyed readers might notice that I differentiate between writing about black in first person and in third person: when I write in first person, I am reflecting on my thoughts during the game, and when in third person I’m looking at the position now, after the game.
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Questions and answers, part three; the 6-4 point

Hello world! Now I finally found the time to answer to Michi’s query regarding the 6-4 point. Like with normally with the questions and answers series, please write new questions as comments to this blog post!

First off, I compiled an sgf file (updated on 10 November 2011!) with some more normal variations along with my comments. The eidogo plugin in this blog doesn’t show comments for now, so please download the file (the download link is just below the plugin) for the comments.

[sgfPrepared id=”0″]

The following, here, is for whole-board fuseki. Please check the joseki file first!

If black played double 6-4 points, for example like this, I feel that white 8 is a really feasible counter. After white 8, black can practically no longer have a big right side,  which makes black 3 kind of useless. Later, if white gets the chance, he’ll take A. Black can surely make a game out of this, but it shouldn’t be so out of ordinary for white anymore.

If white plays double 6-4 points, black is simple to play as well. There are a few moves I would consider: black A is one, making white 2 rather useless again (black B later, then, given the chance). Black C instead would split the left side, not giving white 4 much to work for. Or, black could also just play his own game with D – there’s really no hurry in making the white stones useless.

As a summary, I do consider the 6-4 point playable, but it is making a player’s intentions painfully obvious (white 2 in the last figure clearly aims for the upper side, and white 4 for the left side). Personally I favor the 4-4, 3-3 and 3-4 points, which give a lot more flexibility to the follow-ups.

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Preparing for Rabbity six, part three: learning from past mistakes

Long time no write! The past week has been a bit busy for me, hence the small amount of posts here. Right now I’m in Tampere, ready to play in the Rabbity six tournament which begins tomorrow. I decided to share with you readers what I reviewed with Jeff concerning the game I played with smartrobot on KGS last week. I had black in the game.

Generally, I thought the game was very good, the number of noticeable mistakes being rather small for both. Apart from this game, I’ve played several other games as a preparing for the tournament – also in the European Team Championship tournament on IGS. My general feeling is that I’m pretty much in top shape now!

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