Insei tsumego, part 2

I was at Mimura-sensei’s go dojo again, yesterday. This time he nicely printed me a set of 110 go problems with seemingly basic shapes, for some good regular training. I’d seen other insei having similar stapled tsumego collections earlier, and this was the first one I got for myself! I’m not exactly sure what kind of a convention the dojo has with these, but just as a precaution, I’m thinking of doing all the tsumego by the next time I go to the dojo. Better to be an overworker than a slacker!

Here’s a photo of the tsumego collection, named 山田の詰碁2, Yamada no tsumego 2, and a excerpts from inside. This time, the problems are much less inhuman, and I’d imagine stronger kyu players can get them right as well. There are some recurring shapes here, completely on purpose. I again compiled the problem diagrams with jGoBoard.

Edit evening 13th December: All problems are black to play.

Yes, those are the page numbers up there. Yes, all the pages are similarly full of problems.

Continue reading “Insei tsumego, part 2”

European Team Championship, final round showdown

Last Tuesday, on May 24, was the ninth and final round of the Pandanet Go European Team Championship.  The final round was important in deciding which countries get to play in the European Team Championship tournament in the European Go Congress 2011 in Bordeaux, but it was also crucial in determining which team drops from the A league to the B league next year. The system is such that the last team of the league drops automatically and gets replaced with the winning team of the lower league, and the second to last team of the league plays a qualifying match with the second best team of the lower league. The ninth-round game between Finland and Serbia was to determine which team drops automatically, and which team gets to qualify.

The situation before the round was exceedingly exciting: Finland and Serbia were tied in both game points and board points. If a tie like this were to occur after the ninth round, too, the next tie-breaker would be the number of first-board wins; before the ninth round, Finland and Serbia were tied on this part, as well. In a sense, the first-board game of the match was worth two games. Having known about this situation well in advance, I had been training a lot during three weeks between rounds 8 and 9, my main methods of training having been doing tsumego and reviewing professional games.

Figure 1 Continue reading “European Team Championship, final round showdown”

Questions and answers, part three; the 6-4 point

Hello world! Now I finally found the time to answer to Michi’s query regarding the 6-4 point. Like with normally with the questions and answers series, please write new questions as comments to this blog post!

First off, I compiled an sgf file (updated on 10 November 2011!) with some more normal variations along with my comments. The eidogo plugin in this blog doesn’t show comments for now, so please download the file (the download link is just below the plugin) for the comments.

[sgfPrepared id=”0″]

The following, here, is for whole-board fuseki. Please check the joseki file first!

If black played double 6-4 points, for example like this, I feel that white 8 is a really feasible counter. After white 8, black can practically no longer have a big right side,  which makes black 3 kind of useless. Later, if white gets the chance, he’ll take A. Black can surely make a game out of this, but it shouldn’t be so out of ordinary for white anymore.

If white plays double 6-4 points, black is simple to play as well. There are a few moves I would consider: black A is one, making white 2 rather useless again (black B later, then, given the chance). Black C instead would split the left side, not giving white 4 much to work for. Or, black could also just play his own game with D – there’s really no hurry in making the white stones useless.

As a summary, I do consider the 6-4 point playable, but it is making a player’s intentions painfully obvious (white 2 in the last figure clearly aims for the upper side, and white 4 for the left side). Personally I favor the 4-4, 3-3 and 3-4 points, which give a lot more flexibility to the follow-ups.

Continue reading “Questions and answers, part three; the 6-4 point”